FishbowlDC Writer Responds To ‘Sexy’ Photo Flap: ‘I Don’t Apologize’

fbdc 114x114 FishbowlDC Writer Responds To Sexy Photo Flap: I Dont Apologize FishbowlDC writer Betsy Rothstein created a huge controversy yesterday by publishing a story declaring an “unusual trend” of female “campaign and White House reporters … using provocative, sometimes sexy photographs of themselves for their Twitter accounts.” Today, Ms. Rothstein spoke with The Politicker to give her side of the sexy photo flap.

Ms. Rothstein’s post inspired a huge backlash including a Twitter campaign launched by this reporter to get male members of the media to switch to sexed up Twitter profile photos to express solidarity with our female colleagues who were subjected to this story that was, in my view, “a clear example of the objectification and double standards that have existed far too long surrounding women in the workforce.” Ms. Rothstein fired back at some of her critics on Twitter including Gawker writer Maureen O’Connor who called her “a skank” leading Ms. Rothstein to reply in kind.

Since, I have already weighed in with my opinion on this story, I am presenting the conversation between myself and Ms. Rothstein as an interview edited only for length. Read on hear Ms. Rothstein explain why she felt the story was worthwhile, how the word “skank” is different from “sexpot,” and why she won’t address Ms. O’Connor in the future. Continue reading “FishbowlDC Writer Responds To ‘Sexy’ Photo Flap: ‘I Don’t Apologize’”

Is This Twitter Avatar Too Sexy for Politics?

hunter Is This Twitter Avatar Too Sexy for Politics?
My new profile photo. (via Photoshop master Richard Blakeley and Tom Selleck)

Earlier today, D.C. gossip rag FishbowlDC published a post declaring “an unusual trend” developing among female “campaign and White House reporters” using “provocative, sometimes sexy photographs of themselves for their Twitter accounts.” As examples of this “trend,” writer Betsy Rothstein cited The New York Times’ Ashley Parker, Maeve Reston of the Los Angeles Times and The Hill’s Amie Parnes, all three of whom have, in this reporter’s opinion, absolutely normal, appropriate avatars.

Since Ms. Rothstein’s post only accused women of spurring this “sexy” avatar trend, I found her post to be a clear example of the objectification and double standards that have existed far too long surrounding women in the workforce. Continue reading “Is This Twitter Avatar Too Sexy for Politics?”